We hit a bit of a milestone yesterday as the very first project ever run in All-In by a General Contractor was officially granted LEED Gold certification.

It was on the 6th of May, 2011 that we walked into Webcor’s office… Our long-time advisor, Ann Edminster wanted to introduce us to her friend Phil Williams — And Phil immediately brought in his Sustainability and LEED Rockstar, Megan White.

Over the years, we had the chance to do some site visits, work with students who were interested in the project, sit in on LEED charrettes with the team, and learn a whole lot about AEC, its processes, and the way its many teams work together. This project will be in our hearts forever.

Huge Gratitude and Congratulations to Webcor and the whole CMS team!

Site photo from SFGate, August, 2011

Site photo from SFGate, August, 2011

Bill ReedWe have some pretty fantastic advisors at iLiv and Bill Reed is one of them. In the green building and sustainable design space, Bill is a leader, a thinker, a teacher, a practitioner’s practitioner, an architect, and an author.

Bill’s ideas about Integrative Process are applicable to any team seeking to change the way they work together in order to achieve results that far surpass anything they have done before. So those of you who are not green builders or sustainability overachievers should keep reading in any case.

There is more about Bill at the bottom of the page, but for now, let’s get straight to what Bill has to say:

Any movement towards a sustainable condition requires change.

Moving towards sustainability means that we need to move towards understanding how life works. This means we need to engage in the awareness of complex systems interaction. While most people may feel that they are “systems designers” by the very nature of their work in delivering complex projects, they typically are not working at the level of finding deep synergies among the multiple human and technical systems involved. Nor are they deeply considering how the people processes within the project team, and the living systems beyond, are engaged in a way that inspires long-term health.

Here are 5 ways to a better Integrative Process:

1. Understand the invisible living and operating connections and patterns in and beyond the project

Sustainable design requires a different mindset or mental model. This model is able to look at systems in a more complex way. Instead of looking at just the physical elements of the building, the invisible connections between the elements need to be understood. These invisible connections and patterns, for example, may be manifest in the downstream impact of toxins in building materials, the multiple efficiency and cost relationships between the many variables in an HVAC system and the building envelope, or the impact on social systems due to logging practices or any raw material extraction. At the social scale, it may be engaging in helping the client understand how to be in a more powerful and community building relationship within the place you are building. From an environmental perspective it can mean identifying the healthy patterns of life in the watershed within which you are building and developing new patterns of relationship as part of the process of design.

2. Engage your team beyond just coordination

Sustainable design is not simply about the “coordination” of design features. A rigorous level of enthusiastic and early engagement by all participants is required. A deep understanding of the tools and processes used to explore and make evaluations is required. Since no one has all of this knowledge himself or herself, the role of the team takes on great importance. A systems approach requires a collaborative approach.

3. Don’t be “experts”, be “co-learners”

The very strength of the integrative approach has in it a potential weakness: fostering and working within a collaborative framework is hard because we have been trained to be “experts”. The client expects it, and the team members feel they need to exhibit it. But the basis of a systems approach is the establishment of a network of mutual learning. It is essential to move from being experts to being co-learners. The nodes of individual knowledge that each team member embodies are important, but the network of collective knowledge is far greater and more powerful. Click here to learn about an online collaborative process tool that focuses teams’ collective knowledge through ongoing integrative process.

4. Ask questions, question assumptions, reconsider conventions

The role of questioning is critical in order to inspire answers beyond the conventional. By far, most successful green projects (i.e., projects that achieved the high environmental goals they originally set out to achieve) have done so because the teams had a willingness to ask many questions about the potential beneficial relationships between all the systems in the building, site and region, and to explore many different ways to reach toward better ecological integration. Environmental concerns were not secondary, but neither were they dominant: there were an integral part of the design. The usual “right” answers were never assumed; in fact, they were always questioned. Click here to learn more about one of our projects.

5. Take pleasure in change, and being changed

A mental model that is open and willing to change the way things are done drives the successful integration of green design. Change can be hard. But the process of changing is actually the most exciting aspect of reaching towards sustainability. It is the change of perspective, the change of heart, and the fundamental reawakening to, and awareness of, our deep integrative relationships with the systems of life that makes all this effort worthwhile.

About Bill Reed

Bill Reed is an Architect and leader in systems thinking. His work centers on managing and creating frameworks for integrative, whole-systems design processes. He is president of the Integrative Design Collaborative, and a Principal of the regenerative planning firm Regenesis.

Bill has been an advisor to iLiv since 2011. He served as co-chair of the LEED Technical Committee from its inception in 1994 through 2003, was a member of the LEED Advanced faculty and one of the first twelve USGBC trainers of the LEED Rating System, and was a founding Board Member of the US Green Building Council.

Bill is the co-author of “The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building: Redefining the Practice of Sustainability”, and has written numerous articles on Regenerative Development and Design. He currently serves on the boards of Yestermorrow and AWE, and is an advisor to Environmental Building News .

Posted by: Karen Tucker

 

Tensegrity Sound Source #5  Played by Andrew Culver

Tensegrity Sound Source #5
Played by Andrew Culver

I’ve been holding-off on writing my first blog post for a while now because I couldn’t imagine anything that was at the same time worth blogging about and appropriate to our page. But now, it’s finally time to introduce myself – I’m Karen Tucker. I wear a lot of hats at iLiv, but most of my time is spent “product managing”. I spend time asking a ton of questions to users and potential users of our software, and I translate what I’ve learned to our programmers and to our sales/marketing team. As they say in the business books, I’m the “customer in the room” — I represent you. And this morning, you’ve got your happy pants on because it’s just been confirmed that iLiv’s very own Andrew Culver will be performing at this year’s Living Future unConference. Yay!

And here’s why we’re so excited about that:

I met Andrew Culver in April of 2009 because a friend, who had been raving about his music and telling me I would love it, invited me along to a show. That night, Andrew was performing with electro-acoustic music design and performance group, Sonde, at the Sala Rossa on St-Laurent Boulevard in Montreal. It was the second time that I had the opportunity to see the group, but my first time meeting Andrew.

Sonde had learned from Composer Mario Bertoncini that in order to make original music or “sound”, they would have to create new sound sources. And that’s just what they did. And it was beautiful.

It was obvious that Andrew had also been hugely influenced by the music of John Cage and the teachings of Buckminster Fuller, and I found out that he had actually worked as John Cage’s full time assistant for 11 years, collaborating with him on all aspects of composition, including the design of a computer program that would be responsible for all of Cage’s Chance Operations thereafter. Andrew had also exchanged letters with Buckminster Fuller, and in 1983, he received a personal invitation from Fuller himself to perform his Tensegrity Sound Source #5 – one of a series of 9 sound sources designed along Buckian lines – at his event, Integrity Day. Ironically (because of the course Andrew’s life would take twenty years later), then-journalist, now-environmentalist, Bill McKibben (founder of 350.org), covered Integrity Day in The New Yorker, favourably mentioning Andrew’s performance.

Needless to say, I was impressed – I even married him in 2011. But there’s a lot between 2009 and now that led to Andrew’s upcoming performance of the same sound source at the Living Future unConference this month in Seattle.

At the end of that April evening, Andrew handed me a business card with his contact information. The card belonged to his company, iLiv, a local tech start-up focusing on collaboration in green building design and operations, he told me. He explained that he had been impressed by results he’d gotten from composing scores that were designed to give performers in a large orchestra the freedom to create, or as Andrew described it, “making each individual performer into a soloist”. He explained that iLiv’s software would help other types of teams to collaborate effectively, harvesting the creativity and know-how of each team member in much the same way. In green building specifically, this would lead to better buildings.

An entrepreneur myself, I joined the iLiv team later that year, and began by interviewing the kinds of folks we nicked-named “deep greenies” about their own collaboration processes. I met Bill Reed and learned about Integrative Process, Huston Eubank (an iLiv team member), Ann Edminster, Danny Pearl, Phil Williams, Tom Lent, Steve Selkowitz, Michael ChandlerNadav Malin, and Pliny Fisk, to name a few. They all reported a disconnect in building and a need for a big change and a new way to work together in order to get a building that would be more than the sum of its parts (i.e. a building that was a working system, and part of a greater ecosystem).

It was Mary Davidge who introduced me to the Living Building Challenge, a system like the LEED Rating System, only more stringent. I attended my first Living Future unConference in 2009 and haven’t missed one since. Last year, I even had the opportunity to host a session alongside Ann Edminster and Christine Magar.

In 2012, Living Building Challenge was recognized by the Buckminster Fuller Institute and named winner of the Buckminster Fuller Challenge. Andrew and I ran into LBC Founder, Jason McLennan,  at Bioneers (another “deep greenie” conference) that year, and we pitched the idea of Andrew performing at the next Living Future. Jason and his team accepted and have slotted Andrew as the opening act for this year’s keynote, David Suzuki. Andrew will play his Tensegrity Sound Source #5 the same way he performed it at Integrity Day, only this time he will be introducing David McConville (BFI President) and David Suzuki instead of Buckminster Fuller.

So, come check out Andrew, opening for David Suzuki’s keynote, at Living Future in Seattle this year. I’ll be the one making home videos on my iPad (and sending them to our Twitter followers). ;-)

Karen Tucker

 

Where: Westin Seattle Grand Ballroom

When: 6:30pm, Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Cost: $75 for reception and keynote only (including David Suzuki), or if you’re already attending the conference, admission is free with your full conference pass.

The First Day of Spring, 2013, Montreal

The First Day of Spring, 2013, Montreal

Every Project has it’s seasons.

Spring, as we all know, represents rebirth, the re-emergence of life after the death and quiescence of Winter.

But not every Spring starts as expected. Sometimes the mantle of Winter reappears, concealing, even deceiving. That rebirth can look distant, or in peril altogether.

Don’t fret. There’s warmth under that blanket. And moisture. If Winter was cold and dry, this will even be a blessing for the shoots and seedlings awaiting their moment.

There’s always a little green in there somewhere. (Look at the picture again).

It’s the same with People and Projects. Delays can be positive, giving time for ideas to strengthen, and relationships to gel.

And Spring is on the way, just as surely as Earth revolves and oscillates.

When a Project seems to be suffering a setback, caused by external or indifferent forces — don’t fret.

Give it a few days.

Andrew Culver

 

Image Source: http://www.harpers.org/archive/2005/10/CartoonCreativity

Image Source: http://www.harpers.org/archive/2005/10/CartoonCreativity

Many businesses are starting to use cloud storage for their important files and documents. The ROI is clear: why spend time and money running your own file servers when you can get someone else to do it? And that’s what service providers like Box provide: a file server in the cloud.

But what if you want to help your teams communicate and collaborate better? What if you need them to work together in new ways, build better relationships, be more creative, define and continuously refine a shared vision? These are the benefits of deep, integrative collaboration.

With a file server in the cloud, you are not enabling these benefits, because files are just data, and data does not collaborate. People collaborate.

iLiv All-In can do everything services such as Box can do with files — storage, version control, sharing, auditing, access control — because people do need to share files. But unlike those other services, files are not the center of attention in All-In. All-In puts people and process at the center.

You can’t put people in a box if you want them to be collaborative and creative. And you won’t get collaboration out of a box. Even an online box.

Andrew Culver

The City of Ottawa has recently been considering dropping it’s requirement that all new buildings of a certain size be LEED certified.

The key reason for this decision given by Ottawa councilman David Churnushenko is that, based on his experience, LEED is costing $50,000 per building in documentation time. Even accounting for hyperbole, that is far too much.

However, it is also an indicator that the citizens of Ottawa are not getting the greenest buildings they could.

Sustainable and regenerative design and development come from relationships, creativity, and Integrative Process; not bureaucracy. LEED certification, it turns out, is an excellent way of measuring how effectively you are using your design and build teams. It is fairly safe to say that if they are treating LEED as just paperwork, just pushing paper and email is how your expensive staff and consultants are spending much of the rest of their time together too. If you are an owner (or city councilman) and your staff is moaning about how LEED documentation is costing you tens of thousands of dollars, you are wasting your money, whether you are seeking LEED certification or not.

This might be a perverse argument in favor of LEED, but it is a proven one.

iLiv has customers who are 30-50% more efficient (and if they are consultants, profitable) per LEED project. They are also delivering higher rated and higher performing buildings to their owners at no additional cost. They don’t see LEED as a burden, but as an invitation to discover and deliver a better and more valuable building.

Back in Ottawa, councilman Churnushenko is making one big false assumption: that by reducing LEED paperwork, his teams will become better green designers and builders. Nope. It takes new skills, like listening, being comfortable working outside of your area of expertise, teasing out and using ideas from anyone no matter what their status or specialty, sharing a vision, asking the hardest questions, trusting.

When all of those are in place, you get the best possible realization that the people, place, owner’s requirements, and environment can produce. And if you have proper processes and utilities in place, and integrate LEED from the beginning, your documentation burden should be trivial.

Andrew Culver

Teaming is a term used to focus attention on the activities of people working together in teams. It’s different from the word teamwork, which merely distinguishes the type of work done by people in teams as opposed to solo work or work between principals and assistants.

I have come across the term recently like an old friend; indeed, through an old friend: Amy Edmondson worked with Buckminster Fuller in his final years, just as I did with John Cage, and I met her through my connection to Bucky, which sprung from my tensegrity sound source performances.

Turns out Amy has been researching for 20 years how teamwork is changing in and of itself, as well as how organizations are changing to be more teaming-oriented. She teaches these ideas at Harvard Business School, and she published a book on the subject in 2012.

Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate, and Compete in the Knowledge Economy, Amy C. Edmondson, Edgar H. Schein, ISBN: 978-0-7879-7093-2

 

Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate, and Compete in the Knowledge Economy

 

 

Here’s a brief exploration of how iLiv and Amy’s ideas relate:

Edmondson on Teaming iLiv
Teaming is an active process iLiv All-In is an integrative process collaboration and communication platform
Imagine a fluid network of interconnected individuals working in temporary teams Each All-In Project is organized as a set of events assigned to one or more roles; those who accept responsibility for a project role can come from any organization, discipline, or geographic region, and their active involvement can cover only a part of the project’s overall time span; each new project has its own set of team members, and the evolution of the team over time is easily accommodated.
Teaming blends relating to people, listening to other points of view, … This emphasis on relationships and listening is what our friend and partner Bill Reed is all about.
…coordinating actions, and making shared decisions. The All-In Time pod is built for event coordination, know-how sharing, and decision capturing.
The purpose of teaming is to expand knowledge and expertise so that organizations and their customers can capture the value. The value proposition of All-In is: for the owner, project success (ROI); for the domain expert, a better, self-improving process; and for all project participants, increased creativity and productivity.

And I found these complementary concepts in just the first few pages of Amy’s book!

As all iLiv fans know, our work in software development draws heavily on our past in the performing arts. In dance, music, and theatre, groups are often made up of individuals who have worked together for many years. But just as often, groups are formed for shorter periods (a run of a play) or even for brief encounters (a musical performance).

Teaming highlights—for more traditional organizations—the temporary aspect.

Conventional management often struggles with ephemeral organizational entities, based as it is on the assumption that the organization is supposed to be founded, grow, and reach maturity over many years and decades.

This pull towards perceived stability is a serious risk factor in the current economic environment. The best ideas, and the best products and services, are more often than not born these days of rapid, interdisciplinary, creative processes that bring together people from all over the know-who, know-what, and know-how map.

Teaming describes the dynamics of these one-off collections of individuals, and All-In caters to them with utilities that support their particular qualities and needs. Both can contribute to upper management’s following and understanding of these critical creative production units.

This is only our second post, but already it introduces a category we will expand upon rapidly: the iLiv Reading List. Check back often for more.

And read Teaming!

Andrew Culver

Hello World and welcome to the iLiv blog.

We are due to begin blogging in 2013, but I thought a year-end wrap up was a good idea. It gives me chance to warm up as winter comes on.

iLiv has been a startup since 2005, and we still feel like we are starting up. Mostly this has to do with our vision — to change the way people think and work online — and global change can be sloooow. It is happening though.

2012 has been an amazing year for us. Here’s a short list of some of the nice things that happened:

  • iLiv All-In version 2 had it’s 2nd birthday; we launched October 25, 2010 with 12,000 projects ported over from version 1; our 20,000th project was created on September 12, 2012; as I write this, there are 21,301  and all systems are go!
  • We signed a new, two-year contract with long-term customer GBCI; All-In helps GBCI deliver certifications of all LEED projects worldwide (Canada and India excluded).
  • Bill Reed moved from being an advisor to being a partner—we are working to get his ideas on people relationship mapping into a future release—welcome Bill!
  • And Barbara Batshalom is beginning to build up a process in All-In for the Sustainable Performance Institute.
  • We attended our first Bioneers with Paul, Marta, and John Kephart of Rana Creek and Megan White of Webcor Builders; it’s a nice, calm conference with a broad scope of interest; and there we met:
  • Eric Corey Freed, who got All-In in a hurry and is now an iLiv advisor.
  • iLiv’s Karen Tucker spoke at Living Future 2012 at a session with Ann Edminster and Christine Magar.
  • iLiv’s Andrew Culver celebrated John Cage’s centeniary with a lecture in Vienna, Austria, a bit of opera direction in Ostrava, Czech Republic, and an installation in Victoria, Canada.
  • And we worked our first trade show booth ever, at Greenbuild 2012 in San Francisco, where thanks to the innovative and generous spirit of Megan White and Phil Williams of Webcor Builders, we were part of a small group of innovative companies invited to enliven their big booth; it was a full booth every day, and it showed to the entire conference the value of sharing, working together, and building relationships based on vision and meaning; and the booth was also a photo booth!—check out some photos here; Webcor rocks.

A little more about Phil and Megan of Webcor. Every startup dreams of having innovative early adopters who posses the imagination to sense something new and meaningful, the courage to immediately act on it in pursuit of a strategic opportunity, and the generosity to tell the world what they have found and why it is so valuable.

Phil and Megan are iLiv’s picture perfect early adopters, and we can’t thank them enough. And they’re fun!

Andrew Culver